The life of a scientist is never dull! (Part 1)

But it is at times a little insanely busy!

In the lab I’m currently working on two projects, one is the research project I’ve been working on for a long time and I’m currently writing up part of it as a paper. The other is some loose ends of a project I took on briefly as a side project a few years ago and then handed over to a graduate student to work on – she’s worked hard on this and now we just need a few final experiments for a paper. So all in all my lab work is pretty exciting at the moment and that makes it easy to be motivated.

It isn’t all about lab work though, I went to visit Southfields Community College and had fun talking to some year 9 students about the brain and how nerves grow to the right places to connect up and function properly. I also gave a talk at the London Fly Meeting (A geeky club for people who work with fruit flies!) it was fun to talk about my work and hear about what ideas other people had.

The last two weeks have also involved  paperwork…but that’s not nearly as dull as it sounds! I’ve applied for a couple of jobs and I’ve also been preparing my application for chartered biologist status. As much as this takes up quite a bit of time, it’s a chance to reflect on where you’ve been and where you’d like to go next….

This variety is part of what I love about doing science, but for now it’s back to work for me, some more cool science posts when I have a bit more time 😉

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2 Responses to The life of a scientist is never dull! (Part 1)

  1. liz Alsbury says:

    I hope you keep up these blogs as I find them very interesting as an insight into life in a different field than my own.

    Thanks

    Liz

  2. Thanks, I worried the diary entry would seem like a bit of an excuse…’I’m busy so I’m not writing anything I have to research’!
    On the other hand people who don’t know any scientists probably don’t realise the breadth of things we do, even as academic scientists.

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